The Magazine

People

Janet Macdonald Aitken (1873-1941) was born in Glasgow, the daughter of the lithographer Robert Thomson Aitken of the firm Aitken & Fairy of 177 West George Street. She was a student at Glasgow School of Art from 1887 to 1902, studying design and the figure. Her home address was 2 Woodlands Terrace in Glasgow’s West End. In about 1902, probably with Katharine Cameron, she attended the Atelier Colarossi in Paris. As a portrait, landscape and watercolour artist she was a member of the Glasgow Society of Lady Artists from about 1893, winning their Lauder Award in 1928 and 1937, on both occasions for watercolours. She also produced art metalwork and was a member of the Scottish Guild of Handicraft.

Contributions

November 1893: p. 26, ‘The Secret’ [poem with headpiece illustration]; pp. 27-9, ‘Some words on originality’ [essay with headpiece illustration]; p. 31 [tailpiece illustration]

April 1894: p. 13,‘There was an old man of Tobago’ [illuminated poem with separate tailpiece illustration]; pp. 35-6, ‘Grotesques’; p. 37, ‘The Witches’ [illustration]

November 1894: p. 27, ‘The present’ [illuminated poem with text by Francis Newbery illustration]; p.45; p. 50, Tailpiece, [illustration]

Spring 1896: p. 1, Frontispiece; pp. 7-15, ‘Is the modern stage elevating?’ [essay]; p. 71, tailpiece [illustration]

Agnes Bell Annan (1875-1976) was born in Hamilton, Scotland, the daughter of the leading Scottish photographer Thomas Annan (1829-1887) and Mary Craig. She was the sister of James Craig Annan.

Contributions

Spring 1896: pp. 61-67, ‘A modern Caliban’ [essay]

James Craig Annan (1864-1946) was born in Hamilton, Scotland, the son of the leading Scottish photographer Thomas Annan (1829-1887) and Mary Craig. In 1893 he became a member of the group of avant-garde photographers, the Linked Ring. From 1894 his work began to be shown and published internationally to great acclaim, his work in the Netherlands and Italy which is featured in The Magazine helping to build his reputation. Thomas Annan had acquired the British rights to the photogravure process in 1883 and James became a master of the medium, becoming one of the leading photographers on the international circuit.

Contributions

November 1894: pp. 31-40, ‘Zandvoort’ [essay illustrated with 10 photographs]

Spring 1896: pp. 39-43, ‘Studies in Brown’ [4 photogravures]

David Young Cameron (1865-1945) was born in Glasgow, the third and oldest surviving son of the nine children of Rev. Robert Cameron, the minister of Cambridge Street United Presbyterian Church in Glasgow and his wife Margaret Robertson. He was the brother of Katharine Cameron. The Camerons’ home address was 10 South Park Terrace in Glasgow’s West End. D. Y. Cameron was a student at Glasgow School of Art from 1880 to 1884. After further studying art in Edinburgh between 1884 and 1887 he became a successful painter and etcher, being elected as a Royal Scottish Academician in 1918 and a Royal Academician in 1920. He was knighted in 1924 and appointed King’s Painter and Limner in Scotland in 1933.

Contributions

April 1894: p. 11, ‘Night’ [illustration]

November 1894: Cover

Spring 1896: ‘Studies in Brown’ [4 photogravures]

Katharine (Catherine) Cameron (1874-1965) was born in Glasgow, the seventh of nine children of Rev. Robert Cameron, the minister of Cambridge Street United Presbyterian Church and Margaret Robertson. She was the sister of David Young Cameron. The Camerons’ home address was 10 South Park Terrace, in the West End of Glasgow. Katharine was a student at Glasgow School of Art from 1889 to 1901 studying plant and figure drawing and design. In about 1902, probably with Janet Aiken, she attended the Atelier Colarossi in Paris. She became a successful artist, specialising in flower painting, etching, and book illustration. She was elected a member of the Glasgow Society of Lady Artists in about 1893, and the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1897. In 1928, at the age of 54, she married the merchant and art connoisseur Arthur Kay (1861-1939).

Contributions

November 1893: p.15, [illustration]; p. 16, ‘From across the Atlantic’, [with tailpiece illustration]; pp. 32-3 [2 illustrations]

April 1894: p. 5, ‘Swend the Swineherd [illustration to J. Wilson, ‘The Dark Tower’]; p. 40, ‘Carol’ [text by J. Wilson within illustration]

November 1894: p. 51, ‘In a dark dungeon of the tower Swend had found the princess’ [illustration]; pp. 51-7, ‘On a day when…’, [text with 6 illustrations]

Spring 1896: p. 52, ‘Farm yard sketches’ [illustration]

Ethel Mary Goodrich (1871-) was born in Essex, England, the daughter of Rev. Albert Goodrich, who was the minister of Elgin Place Congregational Church, just off Bath Street, in Glasgow from 1876 to 1890. The Goodrichs’ home address in Glasgow’s West End was 6 Derby Crescent, Kelvinside. Ethel attended Glasgow School of Art along with her sister Jessie from 1888 to 1890 after which the family moved to Manchester.

Contributions

Spring 1896: p. 69, ‘Street Urchins’ [illustration]

Leonard Rome Guthrie (1880-1958) was born in Glasgow the son of master painter and decorator, John Guthrie, and Jessie Finlay Stark. John Guthrie, had attended Glasgow School of Art between 1869 and 1872 and by the 1890s, in partnership with his brother William, had showrooms in Glasgow and London, exhibiting regularly in London’s Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society. In 1897 he formed a partnership with Andrew Wells which lasted until 1902, the firm participating in Glasgow’s International Exhibition in 1901. John Guthrie was a member of the Art Worker’s Guild , Secretary of the Scottish Society of Art Workers, and the Director of the Technical Studios at Glasgow School of Art from 1897 to 1900. Leonard Rome Guthrie entered the Glasgow School of Art as a student in 1893 at the age of 14 studying architecture until 1899. Between 1895 and 1899 he was articled to the Glasgow architect and School governor William Leiper. He later practiced as an architect in Scotland, specialising in interior and landscape design. From the 1920s he worked mainly in London.

Contributions

November 1894: pp. 18-19, ‘II sketches’[illustrations]

Spring 1896: p. 57, ‘Ye Spinning Wheel’ [illustration]

Jane Keppie (1860-1924) was born in Glasgow the daughter of James Keppie, tobacco and snuff manufacturer, whose business was at 16 Bothwell Street in the city and Helen Cuthbertson Hopkins. The Keppies’ home addresses were 42 Hamilton Park Terrace (42, St James Street), Hillhead, in Glasgow’s West End, and, concurrently, Haddington Park West, Prestwick, Ayrshire. Jane attended Glasgow School of Art in 1880. She was followed as a student by her sisters Jessie and Helen. Her brother John (1862-1945) was also a student from 1879 to 1883. The latter was a partner in the architectural firm John Honeyman and Keppie, which employed Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Contributions

April 1894: pp. 15-17, ‘Ophelia’ [essay]

November 1894: pp. 20-3, ‘On the alleged obscurity of Browning’s poems’ [essay]

Spring 1896: pp. 24-33, ‘A Faerie Tale’

Jessie Keppie (1868-1951) was born in Glasgow, the daughter of James Keppie, a tobacco and snuff manufacturer whose business was at 16 Bothwell Street in Glasgow, and Helen Cuthbertson Hopkins. The Keppies’ home addresses were 42 Hamilton Park Terrace (42 St James Street), Hillhead, in Glasgow’s West End, and, concurrently, Haddington Park West, Prestwick, Ayrshire. Jessie was a student from 1888 to 1900 studying design and the figure. As a pupil she followed her sisters, Jane and Helen who attended in 1880 and 1881-1889 respectively, and her brother John (1862-1945) who studied in the School from 1879 to1883. She was a successful student, winning a National Silver medal for a design for a Persian carpet in 1889. From 1902 she was a member of the Glasgow Society of Lady Artists, becoming its treasurer in 1928 and serving as its president from1928 to 1931. In 1930 she won its Lauder award for a water colour. She was also a member of the Scottish Society of Art Workers and the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolours.

Contributions

November 1893: pp. 17-20, ‘A fairy tale’, [with tailpiece illustration];

Spring 1896: p. 21,‘Design for Book Cover’; pp. 22-3 ‘Flower Studies’ [illustrations]; p. 24, [headpiece illustration] to ‘A Fairie Tale’ by Jane Keppie; p. 45, [headpiece illustration] to ‘Silly Ophelia’

Frances Elizabeth Macdonald (1873-1921) was born in Kidsgrove, Staffordshire, England, the youngest of five children of John Macdonald and Frances Grove Hardeman. The family moved to 9 Windsor Terrace in Glasgow’s West End in 1890. In the same year Frances enrolled with her sister Margaret as a student at Glasgow School of Art where they studied until 1894. At the School Frances specialized in oriental design, plant drawing, and the figure, winning a National bronze medal for a design for a majolica plate in 1893. She and her sister along with the architectural students Charles Rennie Mackintosh and James Herbert McNair (1868-1955) developed their own distinctive style which, because of its distortion of the human figure was known as ‘the Spook School’, later evolving into ‘the Glasgow Style’. In 1899 she married McNair and moved to Liverpool where she taught at the School of Architecture and Applied Art at University College. In 1909 on the closure of the School the McNairs moved back to Glasgow where Frances was employed at the School of Art teaching embroidery, enamelling and metalwork. Along with her husband she exhibited work at the 1899 Venice Biennale, the 1900 Vienna Secession and showed a room setting at the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Art in Turin in 1902. Her work was featured in the Yellow Book, the Studio and in several German publications

Contributions

November 1893: p. 1, Bookplate

April 1894: p. 20, ‘The Crucifixion’ [illustration]; p. 21, ‘and Ascension’ [illustration]

November 1894: p. 1, ‘A Pond’ [illustration]

Spring 1896: p. 37, ‘page of illuminated manuscript’ [illustration]

Margaret Memps Macdonald (1864-1933) was born at Tipton, Warwickshire, England one of 5 children of John Macdonald, a consulting engineer, and Frances Grove Hardeman. When the family moved to 9 Windsor Terrace in Glasgow’s West End in 1890, Margaret and her younger sister Frances enrolled as students at Glasgow School of Art where they studied until 1894. At the School Margaret specialized in ornamental design, plant drawing, and the figure She and her sister along with the architectural students Charles Rennie Mackintosh and James Herbert McNair (1868-1955) developed their own distinctive style which, because of its distortion of the human figure, was known as ‘the Spook School’, later evolving into ‘the Glasgow Style’. Along with Mackintosh whom she married in 1900 she became a significant contributor to the international Art Nouveau movement, exhibiting at the London Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1896, the Venice Biennale in 1899, the 8th Vienna Secession in 1900, and the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Art in Turin in 1902. As an artist she became a leading exponent of the gesso medium. She died in London in 1933.

Contributions

April 1894: p. 23, ‘The Path of life’ [illustration]; p. 25, ‘Summer’ [illustration]

November 1894: p. 11, ‘Nov.5.’ [illustration]

Spring 1896: p. 36, ‘page of illuminated manuscript’ [illustration]

Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928) was born in Glasgow, the fourth of eleven children of William McIntosh and Margaret Rennie. He attended the Glasgow School of Art from 1884 to1894 studying architecture, but also design and the human figure. He was a highly successful student, winning National bronze, silver and gold medals for his architectural designs and in 1890, the Alexander Thomson travelling studentship which enabled him to make a three month tour of Italy in 1891. In 1889 he joined the architectural firm of John Honeyman and Keppie as a draughtsman, becoming a partner in 1901. As an architect he produced several groundbreaking schemes of international significance, in particular the new Glasgow School of Art (1896-1909). He was as important as a furniture and interior designer as for his architecture. With his wife Margaret Macdonald, whom he married in 1900, he became a major figure in the international Art Nouveau movement, exhibiting at the London Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society in 1896, the Venice Biennale in 1899, the 8th Vienna Secession in 1900, and the International Exhibition of Modern Decorative Art at Turin in 1902. Abandoning architecture after the Great War Mackintosh concentrated on watercolour landscapes and flower studies, producing a significant body of work in the medium mostly in the South of France during the 1920s. He died in London in 1928.

Contributions

April 1894: p. 27, ‘The Descent of Night’ [illustration]; p. 28, ‘Cabbages in an Orchard’ [illustration]; pp. 29-32, ‘Cabbages in an Orchard’ [essay]

November 1894: p. 5, ‘Autumn’[illustration]; p. 25, [Stylised plant form] [illustration]; p. 46, ‘Tree, August 1894’ [illustration]

Spring 1896: p. 19, ‘Winter’ [illustration]; p. 19a, ‘The Tree of Influence’ [illustration]; p. 19b, ‘The Shadow’ [illustration]; p. 19c, ‘The Tree of Personal Effort’[illustration]

Henry Mitchell (1864-1932) was born at Renton, Scotland the son of Francis Mitchell, gem and seal engraver and his wife May Liddel. Francis Mitchell later became a Free Church of Scotland minister at Renton. Henry Mitchell was a contemporary of Charles Rennie Mackintosh at Glasgow School of Art, which he attended from 1884 to 1892. Between 1888-9 and 1894 he worked alongside Mackintosh as a draughtsman with the architectural firm of John Honeyman and Keppie. after which he went into partnership with William Tait Conner. After 1902 he formed a partnership with Charles Edward Whitelaw who had also worked with Honeyman and Keppie. Much of Mitchell’s architectural work was in Helensburgh.

Contributions

Spring 1896: p. 53, ‘Black & White’ [illustration]

‘Elliot’ [Francis Henry Newbery ] (1855-1946) was Headmaster and Director of the Glasgow School of Art from 1885 to 1918. He was born in Membury, Devon, England and trained as an art master at Bridport School of Art, Dorset and the National Art Training School, South Kensington, London. He was a painter, associated with the Glasgow Boys, and exhibited internationally. He was a member of the Glasgow Art Club, the Royal Glasgow Institute of Fine Arts, and the International Society of Painters and Gravers. After his retirement he and his wife Jessie Rowat, a noted embroiderer and designer who had also taught at Glasgow School of Art, lived at Corfe Castle in Dorset where Newbery continued his career as a painter.

Contributions

November 1894: pp. 7-8, ‘The crescent moon, a thin white curve…’ [poem]; p. 27 ‘The present’ [poem]; p. 48, ‘Love’ [poem]

Spring 1896: pp. 5-6, ‘Hanging like a jewel…’ [poem]

Agnes Middleton Raeburn (1872-1955) was born in Glasgow, the youngest of six surviving children of the corn merchant James Raeburn of 2 Hawarden Partickhill, in Glasgow’s West End, and sister of Charles and Lucy Raeburn. She was a student at Glasgow School of Art from 1887 to 1902. Later she became Art Mistress at Laurel Bank School in Glasgow. She was elected to the Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolours in 1901 and was also a member of the Glasgow Society of Lady Artists from around 1893, serving as its President from 1940 to 1943.

Contributions

November 1893: pp. 5-12, ‘A briny tale’ [with 3 illustrations: headpiece, p.5; plate, p.9; tailpiece, p.12]; p. 13, [text illustration to poem ‘Mist’, by Lucy Raeburn]; p. 21, ‘Hope’ [poem], [with one headpiece illustration]; p. 30, [headpiece illustration to poem ‘When a light spark of talent burns…’ by Lucy Raeburn]

April 1894: Cover; p. 1, Frontispiece; p. 14, ‘Ophelia’ [illustration]; p. 41‘Elfsong’ [illustration of poem by Lucy Raeburn]; p. 44 ‘Thistledown’ [illustration to poem by Lucy Raeburn]

November 1894: p. 47, [Illustration]

Spring 1896: p. 3, [Frontispiece]

Charles Edward Raeburn (1870-) was born in Glasgow, the fifth of six surviving children of the corn merchant James Raeburn of 2 Hawarden, Partickhill, in Glasgow’s West End, and brother of Lucy and Agnes Raeburn. Charles Raeburn did not attend Glasgow School of Art.

Contributions

November 1894: p. 43 [photogtaph]

Lucy Raeburn (1869-1952) the editor of The Magazine, was the fourth of six surviving children of the corn merchant James Raeburn, of 2 Hawarden, Partickhill, in Glasgow’s West End. The sister of Agnes and Charles Edward Raeburn she attended Glasgow School of Art from 1894 to 1895, and produced a repoussé panel to the design of Charles Rennie Mackintosh which was exhibited at the Arts & Crafts Exhibition Society in London in 1896. She married Alfred Spottiswoode Ritchie (1868-1955) of the Edinburgh wholesale stationary firm William Ritchie and Sons in 1898.

Contributions

November 1893: p. 3, [Introduction]; p. 13, ‘Mist’ [poem]; pp. 22-5, ‘Round the studios, October 1893’; p. 29, [tailpiece illustration]; p. 30, ‘When a light spark of talent burns…’ [ poem]

April 1894: p. 33, ‘Spring’ [poem]; p. 41, Elfsong [poem]; p. 44, ‘Thistledown’ [poem]

John Macartney Wilson (1865-) was minister of Bath Street United Presbyterian Church, Glasgow, his father James Wilson was minister of Dudhope Road United Presbyterian Church Dundee.

Contributions

April 1894: pp. 3-9, ‘The Dark Tower, chapter 1’; p. 40, ‘Carol’

November 1894: pp. 13-16, ‘The Dark Tower, chapter III’

Jack Butler Yeats (1871-1957) was born in London, the youngest son of the Irish painter John Butler Yeats and the brother of the poet William Butler Yeats. He grew up in Sligo, Ireland before returning to London in 1887. In his early career he worked as a magazine illustrator but having returned to Ireland he worked as a painter from 1920. Concentrating on Irish subjects, he became the most significant Irish artist of the 20th century.

Contributions

April 1894: inserted between pp. 43 and 44 [8 pages of drawings]